Lee Bay, BVI

Jan 3-6/14. We left Anagada and headed back toward the north shore of Tortola. ┬áThe winds were not as strong on our sail, so we did only 5-6 knots, taking about 3.5 hours to get to Lee Bay on Great Camanoe island. This is a tiny bay and has no mooring balls. We anchored along with only 4 other boats. What a pleasant change after being surrounded by boats at Anagada. The peaceful evenings were also a welcome change (no rave party boats playing loud music til 2am). I paddled ashore with Charlie. There isn’t much sand here, mainly large rounded rocks. He did enjoy a bit of ball chasing into and out of the water and waves. The snorkling wasn’t great as the water was quite cloudy. We did enjoy watching the waves round the point and crash on shore to create a blow hole. The stars were pretty magnificent as well. The highlight was having a mama and baby dolphin swim into the bay while Paul and Charlie were on shore. I watched these two play around the boat for a full five minutes, when it dawned on me to get my camera. I got only one snap before they departed. Shortly after that I spotted a young sea turtle swimming near.

On our last evening here, Paul got out the heavy duty flashlight and shone it on the water. We had quite a show. Large fish, I think are Tarpons, were very attracted to the light. It was our evening entertainment.

We stayed for two days, made water and washed sheets. We would have stayed longer, but the winds picked up on day 3 and our anchor dragged. We took it as a sign to move on. We definitely recommend Lee Bay for anyone wanting to get away from the tourism here in the BVI.

Some perspective on how high in the air the water shoots
Some perspective on how high in the air the water shoots

Anegada, BVI

January 2nd 2014 it was time to start seeing more of the BVI. We’d heard it was worth the effort to go north to Anagada. We departed from Virgin Gorda/Prickly Pear island early in the day and enjoyed a short 2 hour sail at a brisk 8+ knots on a broad reach. What a treat. We worked our way into the mooring area through the marked buoys. This island has reefs all around it. As soon as we secured the boat, we took Charlie ashore for an exploration hike. First discovery were the burrs that Charlie attracts, they attach themselves to his fur like velcro. We had to keep stopping and relieving him of the pesky things. We resorted to walking him on the road. We passed two cows and a young bull. There are no fences, these animals are just wandering like us. The bull seemed attracted to Charlie, so we took the next road back towards the beach and thankfully the bull went back to munching on grass.

Thomas on Anegada with Charlie - kids really took to C
Thomas on Anegada with Charlie – kids really took to C

After investigating the little shops, letting kids pet Charlie, and deciding which restaurant we’d eat at we retuned to the boat, fed Charlie, swam/showered, and got changed into nice clothes for dinner. We arrived early and tried ‘jungle juice’ at the bar during happy hour. It went down easy, so we had seconds. Our dinner reservations were for 6pm at Neptunes Treasure. The island has only 300 inhabitants and they are mainly fishermen who provide fish and lobster to the entire BVI. Paul ordered 1/2 lobster which we saw being delivered to the restaurant fresh off the boat. I had swordfish, breaking my vegan diet for fresh locally caught fish was worth it. Wow it was good.

Sunset from the beach at Anegada
Sunset from the beach at Anegada

We had planned to stay 2 days on the island, but we felt we’d already overspent our budget so opted to leave the next morning. We will explore the rest of the island next time. This island is very dog friendly, for those with dogs that might want to know. We even had one of the restaurants tell us we could bring our dog to dinner. We did draw the line, we don’t want him expecting to get into restaurants when most are not that willing.

New Year’s eve

On the day of New Years eve, we went out to the reef in our dinghys along with friends Ann & John. We packed our snorkel gear. The waves were crashing, but we jumped in anyhow. The snorkeling was good, not the best we’ve seen, but worth the effort. Charlie stayed in charge of the dinghy’s and barked constantly. To try to keep the peace, I swam back to the dinghy. Now the challenge .. to get back in the dinghy without a dinghy ladder. P did it first try. As for me, I took many tries to hop on over the inflated side without success. Eventually making it back on by hoisting a leg over the back of the dinghy and having P give a big pull. Tears were rolling down my cheeks I was laughing so hard.

After snorkeling we went back to Blue Sky and had a cool glass of Caribe (new favorite beer, similar to Corona). All that swimming and climbing back into the dinghy wore us out.

Rainbow - a common sight as light showers come and go
Rainbow – a common sight as light showers come and go

We enjoyed a quiet dinner and sat up listening to the live music on shore. We had thought to go ashore and join in the fun, but didn’t. Sometimes you get lazy, and this was one of those nights. P retired at 10:30 pm. I made it to 11. I did hear the ringing in of the new year at midnight as boat horns were blaring for a good 10 minutes followed by fireworks. I was too tired to get up. Rain followed the fireworks. I closed our hatch and fell asleep.

We started out the new year right with delicious freshly made pastry in our favorite morning spot

Our favorite spot to sit and eat pastry
Our favorite spot to sit and eat pastry
View from where we loved to sample morning pastry
View from where we loved to sample morning pastry

Happy 2014 everyone. Cheers